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Sunday, 3 April 2011

Sad Post

I have been thinking about how fictional characters can behave however the writer chooses. And how that makes them so special to us. We send them off on their wrong path, safe in the knowledge we can help them turn round and find the right way again. Not by a chance event or a magic wand wafting conveniently around their bewildered heads, but all by themselves. They see their problem and realise how to set themselves right again. It makes a good story and writers sit back in satisfaction ( hopefully) just for a moment and feel relieved their special person has made it. Or that at least there's a shred of hope for them after the conclusion.

I wish we could do that in real life too. You may remember my middle daughter's pneumonia last winter and the amazing boyfriend who carried her to the car in the snow, cleared our path out of the garage and stayed with us for hours in the hospital. This same boyfriend now tells her he wasted his time with her and that his new life smoking weed, drinking to excess and collapsing on pavements is a much happier existence. She cares and worries about him. She forgives this massive insult to their time together, as long as he is all right and is truly happy. She remembers the happy times and all the love they had. And she always will. This says so much about my incredible Olivia. I hope she never changes.

But I wish I could believe he has found the right way. And I wish real life empowered us as much as fiction-writing does. But there's truly no more to be done than hope for the best.

8 comments:

  1. Well, there IS always hope. It's hard seeing someone on a self-destructive path, but he is young and may yet find a better way. Your daughter seems to have retained her capacity for love, and has all the time in the world to meet someone else.

    Real life - it's all so messy isn't it...

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  2. How quickly people can change. But your daughter has such a wonderful attitude. I hope everything works out.

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  3. This is sad, but you've obviously raised a daughter to be proud of. Give your lovely Olivia a hug from me.

    XX

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  4. How sad for your daughter, Joanna. But it's all part of growing up, unfortunately, (and parenting!) and your Olivia has such a lovely attitude, with no bitterness towards the errant lad. You should be a proud mother.

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  5. Thank you Joanne, Teresa, Rosemary and Suzanne for all your kind comments, which all make me feel very proud of Olivia. She is recovering well and still retains her huge capacity for love and forgiveness. I could learn a lesson from her, since I am not known for having a very forgiving nature and it must be lovely to have that ability to keep on caring, no matter how let down you feel.

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  6. That's such a shame, Joanna. We know he's probably being very foolish, but what can you do? Perhaps he will realise one day.
    Your daughter sounds lovely, it's very mature of her to be so forgiving. Best wishes to her.

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  7. Thank you, penandpaints. I am proud of how she has coped and how much she genuinely cares.

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  8. I stumbled on your blog when googling "story writing itself" and, I did not have time to read everything now, but I love what I read. You seem to be a very admirable woman. Thank you for your inspiration.

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