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Wednesday, 27 March 2013

Reality Award



Thank you to Hayley, who has nominated me for this gorgeous Reality Award. 

Here are my questions and answers:


If you could change one thing, what would it be?



I would bring back my daughter's horse, Stitch. He was a little mad. The moment he entered a field, he and my daughter became a joyful cloud of dust.

He was also a gentleman.

On a long family walk, with my daughter riding him, my elderly mother was tiring. She said we should all go on ahead and wait for her at the end.

But after a few minutes, Stitch stopped. He looked round at her. And refused to continue until he was satisfied she had caught up.


 If you could repeat an age, what would it be?   



I loved them all, although I wouldn't choose to be in my teens again. I think I was exceptionally selfish and pig-headed. Really rather horrible. So I'd quite like to repeat it, as long as I could change my ways!

I liked being newly-wed in my twenties. I loved having three children in my very late twenties/thirties, although I would have started younger and had four if I had my time again. I felt like the granny of the school playground, being almost fifty by the time my youngest daughter was leaving primary school.

I started writing seriously at forty-nine, so the last few years have been amazing too.

I like it all really. All the different decades have been incredible in their own way.

As Keith Richards said, It's good to be here. But it's good to be anywhere.


What one thing really scares you?



Becoming blind.

I'm not expecting to. But it's something I fear.

If you could be someone else for a day, who would it be?



Truly, nobody else at all. I'm the luckiest woman on earth. I just have to think of my three girls.


And now I'm getting all emotional.


Thank you for the lovely award, Hayley. x


26 comments:

  1. I would agree with the going blind part,Joanna. My answer to the greatest fear question was 'the pitched black' - it's all linked!

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    1. Thank you, Wendy. If I ever woke up in the night in a house I wasn't used to, and if it was one of those pitch black houses where no lights are left on to shine under the door, I would really panic. I would get out of bed to try to grope about and get my bearings, but that only made things worse. Once I was convinced I was in a ship and had been cast adrift!

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  2. Lovely answers, Joanna. My grandfather was blinded through a work accident and lived with us after my gran died when I was young. I've used him in a children's story as he was great at Braille and dominoes! I'm content to be myself too.

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    1. Thank you, Rosemary. Your poor Granddad. It must have been such a huge adjustment for him, but he sounds wonderful.
      I would like to learn Braille. I once had the Braille alphabet and often shut my eyes and ran my fingers over it, but wondered how long it would take to learn it well enough to read.

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  3. Stitch sounds wonderful. If only we could bring them back - or that they didn't have to leave us in the first place. I can see why you got emotional - I had a lump in my throat reading your lovely post :-) x

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    1. Thank you so much, Teresa. You're very kind and I knew you would understand how it feels. We were so fortunate to have Stitch and the gap he left behind will always be there. But I'm so glad he was ours for those few years. xxx

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  4. Lovely answers! Particularly liked the story about your daughter's horse stopping to wait for your Mum!x

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    1. Thank you, Vikki. It was a lovely moment, especially when we all realised why he had stopped. My Mum was really moved. He was virtually human and so gentle. x

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  5. That is so lovely Joanne, such lovely responses to the questions. Congrats on the award. Happy Easter.

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  6. Thank you so much, Madeleine. I really enjoyed answering them.
    I hope you have a lovely Easter too. I'm visiting my Mum today and then relaxing for the rest of it. We still hide eggs in the garden for the girls and I look forward to that very much. Hope it doesn't rain! xx

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  7. Congratulations on the award. Loved reading your answers!

    Have a Happy Easter.

    Nas

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    1. Thank you so much, Romance Reader. Wishing you a lovely Easter too and I hope you have some of the sun we have here this morning. x

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  8. Stitch sounds such a lovely character.

    Enjoy the Easter egg hunt. Bright sunshine here right now, hope it's the same your way! x

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    1. Thank you, Joanne. I'm glad you have some sun. We have a lovely bright morning here too.
      We went to see my Mum in Dorset yesterday and she has already started mowing her lawn and doing jobs outside, even in the bitterly cold wind. She has lots of daffodils, but here the snow seems to have defeated ours.
      Not quite warm enough to venture outside here, apart from the egg hunt tomorrow!
      I hope you have a lovely Easter break, xxx

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  9. Great answers. But you're way too lovely to have ever been a horrid teen so I don't believe it for a minute. xx

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  10. Oh, thank you so much, Suzanne. That's such a kind comment and I appreciate it hugely as it comes from someone lovely.
    Sometimes I go hot and cold at the thought of how standoffish and self-important I was as a teen, especially towards my Mum. Although I think Mums do forgive that, I wonder if I should tell her now that I'm sorry?
    Have a nice, restful Easter break, Suzanne. I was going to sneak in some early morning writing, but have just discovered the clocks went forward so it's not as early as I thought! xxx

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  11. Hi, Joanna.

    What lovely replies. Stitch sounds an amazing horse, part of your family. I guess he thought so too.

    Life has been different in each decade. I don't think I would want to change it either as one thing has led to another, usually something better.

    I feel the same as you about not being able to see. I love being in the light, and looking at everything. x

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  12. Thank you, Sharon. We did love Stitch so much and he is greatly missed. It is a comfort to know he enjoyed his life with us and that we did all we could for him. He had had quite a hard life in the past before we became his owners. So we like to think we made him comfortable and happy.
    I agree with you about one thing leading us into the next and that you have to go through each of these phases, good or bad, in order to progress and find something better. And things always do eventually change for the best. xxx

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  13. Very interesting questions and interesting answers too!! LOL
    Good to be here, happy to join in
    Keep inform
    Best Regards
    Ann & Philip @ Philipscom
    An ambassador to A to Z Challenge @ Tina's Life is Good
    And My Bio-blog

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    1. Thank you very much. That's very kind of you. x

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  14. Just when you thought you were safe, Joanna, I've nominated you for a Leibster blog award - no obligation to accept :-) x

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    1. Thank you so much, Teresa. That's really kind of you. So sorry I'm very late with this reply. xx

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  15. Good answers Joanna. I am also glad to be where I am now.

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    1. Thank you, Pat, very much. It's good to know you're happy with your present life. There's nothing harder than looking back and seeing somewhere you loved more than where you are now, and knowing it's gone. x

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  16. I just popped over here because you commented on my blog, and I love the way this post gives a real insight into who you might be... flash fiction in action, even though it's fact! 8-)

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  17. Many thanks, broken biro. I really like the idea if this being flash fiction. x

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